Analysis Monday – Cold

Every Monday we will be looking at a short extract from a text and analysing what and how the writer has written. Feel free to add your own comments! Thought this one would be approriate for the first post of April!

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“I don’t remember the date, the month. I don’t even remember the time of year. But I know it wasn’t summer. It was cold. Not like the cold of winter, when the gentle frost stings your nose. It was wet and chilly, disagreeable. Like the cold of late autumn, when the birds have already flown away, the trees are bare, the earth is dark yet the sky is too stingy to send a blanket of snow to cover its wretchedness. Or like the cold of early spring, when everything is still tentative, uncertain – when it seems the battle in the sky is not yet over, the sun has been taken prisoner, and the heroes of light could still turn around dolefully and say: “No, we won’t make it; the dark and cold are stronger than us – spring won’t win this time.””

German Sadulaev (https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/nov/21/german-sadulaev-chechen-chechnya-war)

This is beautifully layered piece of writing explores his feelings of despair and loss when returning to Chechnya after the first war there.

– Lovely and peaceful (as suggested by word “gentle”) image but the writer has already informed you that this is not the kind of cold he is feeling – foreshadowing what is to come. 

– Rule of three – building up negative images, builds up to a climax of the earth is dark, showing how complete this cold is

– Personfication – showing that the sky, somethingnormally posiutive and beautiful, is now conspiring to create more misery

– Layering up of negative word choice – this all adds to the sense of sadness and hopelessness

– Extended Metaphor – references what the writer will talk about later in the passage but also adds to the mood and atmosphere of this paragraph

– Positive word choice to reinforce again the central images of this paragraph

 

Analysis Monday – T-Shirts

Every Monday we will be looking at a short extract from a text and analysing what and how the writer has written. Feel free to add your own comments!

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I blame the T-shirts. The casual wear favoured by those founding wunderkinds of tech – Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs, Sergey Brin, Larry Page and the rest – lulled us into a false sense of security. Even after they’d begun making serious money, too many of us took the aversion to a collar and tie to mean the likes of Facebook or Google were not really scary capitalist behemoths, but retained the spirit of the upstart startup: quirky, plucky and driven chiefly by a desire to do cool stuff with computers. They certainly saw themselves that way, Google charmingly distilling its mission statement into three words: “Don’t be evil.” It’s amazing how long an initial image of laidback informality can endure: for decades, Britons struggled to see Virgin as a corporate giant because Richard Branson had long hair and a goatee.

Jonathan Freedland (to read article in full – https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/23/people-owned-web-tech-giants-facebook-cambridge-analytica)

– Short sentence to open and draw in reader. Creates a slightly humourous tone but also sumarise the point being made

– Emphasises point that we were decieved into believeing them (Word choice) 

– Contrast – showing the difference is what they are and what we think they are.

– Rule of three (after colon) – to emphasise what the spirit of a start up is, this also builds up the contast with the big “capitalist behemoths”

– Word choice – again building up the idea of the cool start-up for a billion dollar company

-Sentence Structure – colon shows that the writer is expanding on the point being made, giving an example which we all know and understand and shows that this is not a new problem.

Analysis Monday – Birthdays

Every Monday we will be looking at a short extract from a text and analysing what and how the writer has written.

Feel free to add your own comments/analysis below!

amy lame'

“Birthdays plunge me into a great fog of dissatisfaction. It started on my 19th with a deep trepidation about leaving my teens. You could get away with just about anything by blaming it on teenageness but 20 seemed, like, totally old. Now 20 seems, like, totally a long time ago. A general feeling that I’ve under-achieved my way through life thus far is compounded by another year gone and not much changed. Yet another year where I failed to unpick life’s great mysteries: God, the universe and karaoke.”

Catriona Stewart (http://www.heraldscotland.com/opinion/13060935.the_birthday_dumps/)

– Great imagery – The imagery of the fog is perfect for describing that feeling that lingers around and makes it difficult to see your way through

– Trepdidation is the perfect word to use here- it implies the dread and fear that is felt as the writer gets a year younger.

– Use of teenage slang (,like, totally) helps to create an informal and humourous tone. It tells the reader that she isn’t taking herself totally seriously.

– Great use of the rule of three to help the self-mocking tone up. She uses an anti-climax (karaoke) to underscore the other two, more serious, points.